DnDF17: The adventure so far

Last week, on DnDF17 (some artistic liberties have been taken)

The weary members of Bacon Ipsum wound through the streets of Moscone. They were silent, all of them thinking only of the destination and what would await them there – the best coffee in Forcelandia and payment for their efforts defeating what may or may not have been a dragon. What was definitely not a dragon. What had definitely been someone with too much time on their hands. Either way, the team would be paid through the Trailhead Expeditionary Forces.

The Apex palace loomed before them, the Master of Coffee nestled within its walls, when Kriv, the surly and aloof wizard heard his name being called. The rest of the team paused, waiting for their companion to complete his transaction, all of them on edge at the rough tones of the conversation. Brunhilde, the dwarf better known as Trailblazer, watched and waited, ready to jump in and pull the wizard out of a scuffle.

“Oh, hey, guys,” Datatello suddenly began at her side, pulling her attention away from hearing what words were being exchanged, “I just remembered! Remember those crystal shards that we found in that basement a long time ago?”

Kriv and Brunhilde remembered, of course, having been part of their first adventure. Bakaryu and Flash both nodded politely, not wanting to correct the half-orc. After all, they had all traveled long enough, it was easy to forget who was where and for what.

“I sold them!”

Kriv straightened under his robe, hearing the words sold, as he approached the group once more.

“I found a buyer at the Wizard School, and this guy bought them for 600 gold!”

“600 gold?” Kriv began.

“Yeah! I gave it to a children’s hospital,” Datatello beamed.

Kriv shriveled within his cowl, “You gave it away?”

“Not all of it,” the half-orc continued, producing pouches from his bag and handing them out, “here’s what’s was left.”

The party entered Master of Coffee, placing orders and taking their respective places at a table large enough to seat them all.

“We should check in,” Kriv muttered, waving for Bakaryu to follow. It was best that others be with him when dealing with their handler, and the noble paladin was a good choice, despite her looming presence and scaled visage.

Their handler sat in the back, clothed in all black, peering at them from behind half-moon spectacles, “Yes?”

“We’re checking in,” Kriv spat, his mood only darkening after the exchange he shared with his supplier, Quick. His problem was becoming increasingly expensive, and he just wanted to take on the next job. And the next. However many it took.

“I suppose you have evidence, then?”

Something like a growl left the wizard, as he turned and stalked back toward his dwarf companion, who was staring into the steaming mug in front of her and watching Datatello request other patrons join him in a game of darts. She had offered, but experience had proven that her height put her at somewhat of a disadvantage for the monk’s preferred play style, specifically another player throwing a dart at his face, so he could deflect it.

He was, perhaps unsurprisingly, very good at the game.

“Do we have any evidence from the last job?”

“Dragon scales,” she leveled at Kriv, taking a sip.

The words sparked the memory of their dragon born compatriot, who smiled widely – probably smiled; the teeth made it difficult to tell – and presented a bag, “Oh yes! The dragon scales.”

Satisfied, their handler nodded, “500 gold then.”

Brunhilde saw Kriv’s jaw clench, “500? Fine. Well what’s the next job?”

“There is not one.”

Apparently things were quiet. Too quiet. They would swiftly become much louder, if Kriv had nothing to occupy himself with. Trailblazer prepared to talk him from the ledge, shove something free in front of him and distract him, but the planning was unnecessary, as just at that moment, the door opened, and the loud thumping of heavy boots rang through the air.

The coffee tavern, as a whole, turned to watch a group of angry dwarves step inside. They were known to Brunhilde, the one at the fore a known rabble rouser, and to her surprise, a usually friendly Skuid vendor from the markets. Friendly or no, it was clear this group was looking for trouble.

The friendly monk approached, hoping to calm whatever had the dwarves so angry, “Hello there! Can I offer you a beverage?”

“Ale,” the leader growled at Master Coffee.

Master Coffee smiled calmly, “I’m afraid we don’t sell ale here.”

“What kind of tavern is this?”

Datatello watched the exchange, clearly uncomfortable with the tone. Kriv, too, saw the tension rising.

“Datatello, ask me for ale.”

The half-orc tilted his head, “I don’t need it. They’re-”

“Just ask me for ale. Tell me you need ale. Ask me for ale!”

Unsure what the wizard was on about, but not wishing to disappoint, he complied, “Kriv, can I get some ale?”

The wizard reached into his robe, digging around for a moment, before pulling out a smallish barrel and showing it to the dwarves, as well as the proprietor, “Here. Ale. Please open the barrel.”

Master Coffee didn’t seem pleased with the idea, but he agreed. Kriv placed the barrel on the counter and stepped away, just before an axe whizzed through the air and shattered the wooden cask.

Moving on instinct, Kriv raised his hand, fire springing from his palm to shoot directly at the dwarf who had thrown the axe. The smell of burnt dwarven beard followed, as well the angry shout of alarm and the sound of many heavy weapons being drawn from their scabbards and holsters.

It was enough for Datatello. The half-orc pulled his bo-staff free, swiping high and then low against the dwarf just in front of him before moving beyond him to stun the second armed intruder. He was caught on the calf with a blade but elected to ignore it, the cut barely registering, as he left open-handed strikes on his attacker.

There was a brief pause, as Bakaryu stood, looking down at the dwarves, “Listen, friends, let’s not be short sighted here. I understand that tempers may be short, but fighting is only a short-term solution. I’m sure there’s a way to short – oh, no, sort – this out, so that everyone gets what they want, and we can all go our separate ways shortly.”

Flash, their silent thief, ducked into the shadows, hoping to remain unseen until he could strike.

Brunhilde blinked at the calm, reassuring dragon born, wincing with each passing moment. Other dwarves, who had been ducked behind tables to avoid being caught in the fray, stood to level shocked glares at the paladin.

Before the angry, at least no longer flaming, leader could roar and charge at her companion, Brunhilde slid her longbow around and lifted it, tilted to ensure she could use it, and took aim. The arrow soared through the air and struck its intended target – the thick rope holding onto a strange contraption, unique to this establishment, with wooden blades than spun lazily through the air. The rope snapped, and the heavy instrument fell, knocking into the dwarf’s shoulder and sending him to the ground, though it did not knock him out.

That was a mistake.

The dwarf stared at her, recognition sparked, and he bellowed toward the door, “SHE’S HERE!”

The spectacle served as enough of a distraction, though. Flash leapt from the shadows, his sights on the dwarf who was still stunned by Datatello’s flurry of blows. It was all he needed, taking two swipes, enough that the dwarf staggered away.

Ignoring his companion in need, the dwarf who had just yelled sprinted, or at least lunged forward. Brunhilde watched as the attacker, and her past, rushed to greet her. He didn’t make it to her, though, instead tripping. Her relief was short-lived, as behind came another attacker, this one wielding two axes, both of which came down swiftly and lodged deep in her chest.

She grunted, unable to pull away, then staggered when the dwarf ripped the blades back out. Pain blossomed, and she at first thought the shaking of the wooden planks beneath her were her imagination until she saw the hulking form coming through the doorway.

All patrons stopped and stared at the dwarf entering the coffee tavern, if one could still call this creature a dwarf. Parts of his body had been covered in ore, as if he had been dipped in molten metal and left to cool, or something blew up and fused to his skin. He turned to Trailblazer, “Traitors die a terrible death,” he rumbled.

Never one to standby, when the shock wore off, Datatello sprung into action, launching his magical rolling board at one of the stocky attackers who had hurt his friend. It did little to deter their enemy, but it was of little concern. He swung back with his hand, feeling the distinct crunch of crushing bone under his palm, followed by the sound of someone gasping for breath.

“Someone throw me an alley-oop!” the monk shouted.

For a breath, nothing happened. Then the half-orc, Sodak, popped out from a table, tossing a dart. Datatello spun, kicking the dart furiously. It turned and sped toward the new-comer, only to ping uselessly against the metal coating on his skin.

Bakaryu rushed past the remaining combatants, ignoring the dwarf that ran into her, only to bounce off again with a grimace. She inhaled deeply, rearing back, then opened her mouth again, a purple and blue cloud of writhing electricity spitting out at the intruder. The tendrils wrapped around him, sparking to life, then fizzling out. He choked for a moment, enough time for her to hurl a nearby table. He stood and shook off the energy in time to watch the table soar overhead and crash through the window behind him.

He ignored both attackers, his focus still intent on Brunhilde, as he took floor-rattling steps toward her.

“You are a disgrace to your kind,” he spat, “First you took the dishonorable path of a role not meant for you. Then you abandoned that path for an even less honorable path.

THUMP. THUMP.

“And now you sit in a tavern that does not even serve ale!”

THUMP. THUMP.

“You have usurped your rightful place.”

THUMP. THUMP.

“You are a crime with your very existence.”

THUMP. THUMP.

As he approached, the remains of his face became clear, and Trailblazer realized who this dwarf was, why he was angry, rambling and intent on destroying her. Eric the Unready.

Maybe it was the pain or the blood loss, but all she could think to say was, “Eric, hey. How are you?”

He blinked at her, “I – what?”

It was enough time for her to take action. She kicked Datatello’s magical rolling board at him, as he took a step, hoping to trip him. His foot landed on the wooden board, and as he brought up his other foot, he lost his forward momentum, though not his balance. Brunhilde watched, as he rolled slowly back away from her, his low center of gravity keeping him upright, but the momentum of the board enough to carry him at least a few feet away.

Sodak, still peeking out from behind the table, stuck out a leg.

Eric toppled onto his back with a roar, and Trailblazer, eyes narrowed, swung out with her short sword at the closest thing still nearby, the dwarf who had nearly cleaved her. He grabbed at his throat and fell away.

Seeing his opportunity, Flash narrowed his eyes at the monstrosity on the floor. The metal and stone had him still prone, rolling in an effort to stand. Before he could, Flash moved with the speed he had been nicknamed for, trusty daggers in hand.

As the dwarf stood, Flash dropped, sliding past him on the floor to dig one biting dagger into the behemoth’s back.

Eric the Unready roared and swung back with his left arm. Flash ducked, leaning back and then lunging with his remaining blade, sliding it under the dwarf’s arm to lodge firmly in his chest. Eric stumbled back, gurgled, and then fell to the floor, unmoving.

The remaining dwarves took their cue, rushing out of the tavern.

Through the open door, they all saw it. Smoke and flames.

Moscone was burning.

It’s that time again!

Last year I did a thing to help raise money for ExtraLife, and I introduced the world to Brunhilda Battlehammer, AKA Trailblazer, AKA my dwarf ranger character for DnDF16.

tblzr
THIS dwarf ranger

I have news for you all…

SHE IS BACK WITH A VENGEANCE! And by vengeance, I simply mean that I will be reprising this role for DnDF17!

Shame on me, late to the party and such, but if you’re curious/interested/want to watch me and some of my Salesforce friends do this thing…it starts TONIGHT at 9pm EST!

Details here: https://cloudforcecollective.com/dndf17/

And, perhaps most importantly, why are we doing this? Yes, it’s fun. Yes, it’s an excuse to hang out virtually with some of my favorite people. But it’s also a really important thing we’re doing. This is part of the ExtraLife fundraising initiative, a nonprofit that allows gamers (like me) to give back to something that matters.

Here’s why we’re participating: https://cloudforcecollective.com/2017/10/16/ddf17-why/

Ready Admin One

Or what video games have taught me as a Salesforce admin (and consultant).

I realize that this will come as a shock to almost 0% of my audience, but I like to play video games. Mostly long (100 hour plus) RPGs with rich stories, well-developed characters, or at least enough of one to mask the lack of the other.

Growing up I didn’t have a game console. It wasn’t until I was an adult, free to make my own choices and eschew responsibilities as I saw fit, that I really started getting into them. As an avid reader and someone who revels in the feeling of accomplishing a task, they’re kind of perfect. There’s a story, and there are clear steps and tasks presented that have clear success or fail requirements. You know…not at all like real life.

All the same, I’ve been able to apply a lot of things from my hobby to my job. If you’re a fellow gamer, you might recognize some these things, too.

Leveling up can be a grind

I am a trophy hunter. If there is an achievement to be unlocked in a game, I’ll probably go after it. Enter: Skyrim.

One of the last trophies I earned before getting platinum was the silver Master trophy, for reaching Level 50. I had completed the main game with two different characters. I had finished all of the side faction storylines, but I still wasn’t quite there. So I did what any other Skyrim fan has done – I started grinding through low-level abilities to get that sweet XP. I made so many daggers; I cleared so many dungeons. It was boring.

platinum700

But I got the trophy. And I got the platinum.

Twice. (Thank you, Bethesda, for re-releasing it on the PS4.)

If you think that only applies to games, you’ve obviously never gone after multiple Salesforce certifications. Reading and re-reading release notes, help articles, the study guide, blog posts, Trailhead, etc. It takes some serious heads-down time to study for some of the certifications out there, and yeah, it can be really boring. But at then end, you have a brand new certification.

Side quests

It’s Monday morning for the solo admin, and they have their week planned out. Got some Trailhead badges to earn, a new dashboard to build, and a meeting with the steering committee. They have one goal this week: deploy a new custom object and flow, to support a functional group that is adopting Salesforce.

preston

Except….

A user needs a password reset.

Another user deleted a record but they can’t remember which one, and they need it back.

An executive needs a report of all sales in 2012, for some reason they have deemed unimportant to share.

And on and on and on. Each random task may only take a handful of minutes, but those minutes start to add up, and soon your inbox is full of minor requests that may have a time limit attached to them. At least all experience is good experience, right?

It’s good to recruit companions

dangerousEven non-gamers know this one.

It’s not impossible to finish quests and storylines alone, of course. But misery and joy and struggle…pretty much everything loves company. So why wouldn’t you recruit companions? Especially if they can fill in gaps in your abilities or knowledge.

Most of us already know the importance of the community, so I can pretty much just…leave this here, right? Ohana, my peeps.

Once a completionist…

This is actually a thing (read about the Zeigarnik Effect here). Once a gamer (or an admin) starts on a quest, we have to finish it. Luckily many of these tasks have definitive end-games.

Slay the dragon.

Deploy the change set.

Find the pan.

Build the report.

We obsess over the things we haven’t completed. How many of us have gone to sleep, thinking about data schema, only to wake up with the answer and excitedly go about building what we imagined?

How many of us have to get all the Trailhead badges? (BTW, if you think Trailhead hasn’t taken into account some of what I’m writing about here, you aren’t paying attention.)

And it’s not just video games

Ultimately it comes down to liking the feeling of solving a puzzle. Admins are problem-solvers. We are people that like to get our hands dirty, play with something, and make it work. For me it’s like video games. For some people it’s like puzzles or building things.

We are the people who stay up into the wee hours, searching the community, building and rebuilding our flows, until it is done.

And bonus! Now I can check this particular task off my list.

Skeleton-King-Quest-Complete

Time flies etc.

I have had a few people lately approach me to ask about what it’s like being a consultant. I’m always a little surprised by that because I think “why would they ask me? I haven’t been at it very long.”

I looked at the calendar recently. It’s already almost September. 2017. What the actual…anyway, that means that I’ve been a consultant for over a year now. And being the annoyingly introspective person that I am, that led me to hours and hours of thinking about that question and my answer.

I still don’t feel like I’m the right person to ask. There are still days where I haven’t quite gotten my feet underneath me. The treadmill is still just a tad too fast sometimes, and I stumble. Being human means that I focus a lot on those stumbles and less on the increasing number of successful steps.

Here’s how I’ve been answering that question.

Becoming a consultant is like any other major change in life. Day to day, nothing changes. I get emails from clients – sometimes I know the answer off-hand, and sometimes I have to do some research. I build things in Salesforce, and then I test those things and rebuild them. I provide insight into what the platform can and cannot do, what it can do natively vs. custom, what might be better left to a third party app, etc. I encourage admins to learn, and somewhere in all of that, I manage to occasionally put on a virtual meeting for the West Michigan WIT group.

But then I look back over the past 3 months, and I realize I have learned quite a bit. Over the past 6 months, 9 months…a year. I see things that I did early on that I would do differently now. Not that I was wrong then, but I’d be better prepared for them now.

There are little things, too. I speak more confidently about some things than I used to. I recognize patterns that I hadn’t noticed before. Gradually, I’m getting faster with some things.

Even I keep waiting for something to click. Some obvious and clear sign that says “You are now a Consultant.” But that’s not going to come. My business cards and job description say that. What I do on a daily basis says that.

That’s been the biggest lesson for me. I’ve learned in every job I’ve ever had – that’s what we do. This time it just feels more intangible. I can’t say “I now know how to complete an OSHA 300 and 300A form.” It’s more things like…”I now know that I can use Talend for data transfers and transformations.” But that encompasses so many things, not just a single task or ability.

As one of the least patient people I know, this kind of slow adaptation and realization of what I’ve learned has been both the most difficult and most rewarding part of the transition for me.

I don’t know if that’s the kind of answer people are looking for when they ask. Being a consultant varies depending on where you work, on what kind of team you’re working with. Just like being an admin at one place will be different than being an admin at another. But that’s the best answer I can give.

Regardless I’ve appreciated the questions because they forced me to take that long look and give myself some credit for how far I’ve come. And it’s made me really excited for whatever will come next. What will I know 3 months from now? 6 months, 9 months, a year?

If nothing else, I can safely say that being a consultant is never dull, and that’s probably the most important advice I can offer.

 

Georgia on my mind

I grew up in the peach state, various towns and cities at different times, only vaguely aware that people lived in other states. It’s weird how that happens. When you define a place as Home, it feels strange sometimes to think that there are billions of people out there who not only don’t live near you, but have most likely never even heard of your town.

When I was very little, I affected a thick Southern drawl, drew out my syllables as folk do in Georgia. But over time that dwindled, even living in the state. People who meet me now will not often guess that I spent the better part of my pre-adult years (and even early adult) in the foothills of Appalachia.

Fun fact: Georgia is the largest state East of the Mississippi. Yes, it’s true. Yes, even when you take the Upper Peninsula into consideration for Michigan.

I mention that because when I tell people I grew up in Georgia, they almost always know someone in Augusta or Savannah. I lived about 6 hours from them, in that case. I most likely don’t know them.

I’m headed that way on Saturday, the hubby and I hopping in a rental car to make the drive down. We’ll spend some time with my family at the homestead in the hills, and then I’m dragging him along with me to Southeast Dreamin’.

SED-Web-Logo-e1453762337688

In addition to being excited about being in the place I learned how to walk and speak and be an adult*, I’m really excited about this stuff:

  1. Charlie Isaacs‘s keynote. He’s one of my favorite people in the community, so I’m very happy to see him speak.
  2. Rebe de la Paz is going to talk about educating end users – a topic near and dear to my heart.
  3. For my NPO friends, you can check out Adam Kramer‘s session on Optimizing NPSP as an Admin.
  4. My friend and fellow #GifSquad member, Amy Oplinger, is reprising her fantastic session on Imposter Syndrome.
  5. Phillip Southern is going to share how they created the open-source Trailhead leaderboard.
  6. Doug Ayers is sharing his presentation on using Process Builder to create a Chatter Bot.
  7. THE Jen Lee of Automation Hour fame is sharing a session on Flow.
  8. Chris Duarte‘s closing keynote! It’s like a delicious Salesforce sandwich, people.

Did I mention the Hackathon on Thursday (this will be my first!)?

Did I mention the SaaSie Tech Social?

Did I mention time with the community, seeing the #Ohana?

To be honest, Georgia hasn’t been home in almost 10 years, but having so many great things to look forward to, I know it’ll feel a lot more like it next week.

See you there?

*I am legally an adult. Whether or not I’m an “Adult” is up for debate.

 

It’s Official: Sales Cloud Consultant

I bit the bullet last Saturday and took the Sales Cloud Consultant exam.

(She writes, as if she hadn’t been studying 1-2 hours per night for the past two months.)

I did the online proctoring, something I said I would not do again. But you know the saying about the best laid plans. It only took 10 minutes to get it set up this time. We’ll call it a win.

I thought about how I wanted to share this, if at all. My natural instinct is to provide some sort of guide, some insight to those that are considering taking it, preparing. There are already some great resources out there, though, and I’m not a fan of reinventing the wheel.

So instead I’m going to give you some honest feedback about what you can expect:

  1. Most people don’t pass this exam on the first try
  2. Your test-taking ability will come into play on this exam
  3. There is a LOT of information covered – both breadth and depth
  4. No matter what you study, there will be things you did not anticipate

I prepared for this exam for almost two months, starting with about an hour study each day and moving up to 2 hours each day a couple of weeks out.

I did what I always do. I downloaded the study guide, prioritized topics based on what I felt the least comfortable with, and I went to work. I used Salesforce’s existing documents, reviewed some Trailhead modules, inspected existing blog posts about Sales Cloud (shout out to Salesforce Ben!), and took copious notes. This method got me through both Advanced Admin and App Builder.

I guess technically it got me through Sales Cloud, too.

If you’re looking toward Sales Cloud on the horizon, here’s the best advice I can offer you: be patient with yourself and DON’T PANIC.

dontpanic

As I write this, I’m cool as a cucumber, ya dig? But literally five minutes before the exam, I could feel my heart trying to rip itself free from my chest. Taking these exams IS nerve-wracking. But guess what – it’s not the end of the world. All you can do is take a deep breath and focus on the question. Don’t worry about whether or not you’re going to answer the exact way Salesforce wants you to (because sometimes it’s really not clear). Worry instead about understanding the problem presented, understanding the potential solutions.

Having certifications is great. I love it. I love getting my name printed on paper.

But certifications aren’t going to make you a good consultant. Listening will. Empathy will. Curiosity will. A growth mindset and patience will. If you have those things, then you’ll do fine.

And, if you are taking the exam soon and somehow stumbled here, I hope you take a moment to breathe and relax. You’ve got this.

 

 

Marketo v. Pardot Cage Match: Round 3, Administration

If you’re wondering “why are we talking about administration, if the last round was emails?” Well, frankly, because it was the next thing I thought about. I kept trying to think of a logical order to do these in and just came up short. Then I remembered that this is my blog, and I can do these in whatever order they come to mind.

So let’s talk about what Administration means here.

A lot of marketing automation functionality focuses on marketing (true story). And a lot of comparisons and ratings focus on that. That’s good; it matters. But if you’re responsible for managing the platform, there’s more than email templates, campaign managements, and calendars. There are integrations to consider, user management, and what-have-you.

Round 3 of our cage match focuses on common administration functions: user management, integrations, system maintenance, and certification.

User Management

How easy is it to create users and control their access to the database?

Marketo

If you can read and click on checkboxes, then you can manage users and permissions in Marketo.

marketousers

Users and Roles that can be assigned are managed in the same place, under the Admin section of Marketo.

marketoroleRoles should be set up first, and editing or creating them is simply a matter of checking off the items that the role should have access to. Access and abilities are provided in handy sections – you can check the global setting or get granular, if need-be.
Easy as that.

Adding users is about the same. Simply click on the New button, put in the email, select their Role, provide an access expiration if necessary, and boom – the new user is emailed.

Access to Marketo is not controlled by license, but some functionality – namely the Calendar – is. Keep that in mind.

Pardot

Maybe it’s because I just handled issues surrounding this, but one thing that you must understand about Pardot users – if you want sales reps to see Pardot info in Salesforce, they MUST have a license. And if you want it to be easy for them to access, you MUST turn on SSO for each of them. Not doing so can cause issues.

Point, Marketo.

Other than that, it works much the same. Create  a user, send them an email, and there is no user license cost.

Integration

Beyond integration to a CRM (which is important. I did a session about it!), which is important, how easy is it to integrate with other services?

Marketo

LaunchPoint. LAUNCHPOINT.

For the uninitiated, LaunchPoint is basically a big book of available integrations that just require you to sign into the thing you want to integrate. They have a pretty good list of things that do this.

Is the integration that you need NOT on LaunchPoint? I bet they use REST or SOAP API, in which case you can access your endpoint, userID, and encryption directly in the Admin area of Marketo. They have a host of partners out there that can be setup and integrated in 15 minutes.

As far as Salesforce integration goes, it’s easy to set up and maintain. Create a Marketo user (with its own Profile), put in that user’s information in Marketo, and that’s it. Ok, that’s not it. There’s other setup – creating the fields that are needed, making sure to hide anything you don’t want Marketo to have access to, etc. But essentially that’s it.

From there on out, every 5 minutes there’s a sync. You can sync Leads, Contacts, Campaigns – it all fits together really well.

Your Sales reps can see Marketo information via the AppExchange packages Sales Insights. This creates Visualforce pages that you can add to the page layout (now Lightning compatible), as well as a custom object where ALL Marketo information can be found. Reps do not have to have a Marketo license in order to use these features.

Pardot

Pardot calls them Connectors – a series of pre-built integration between Pardot, certain CRMs, and other marketing software types (webinar platforms, social media platforms, etc.).

They have a pretty good list of options.

pardotconnectors

But if you use something else, you need to know how to create some API integrations.

Connecting to Salesforce here is similar – you create a Pardot user in Salesforce and then use those credentials to create the connection. Then you have to individually map custom fields to Salesforce. Once that’s done, you can use Automation rules to sync the lists that you want, or you can sync individual Prospects. Syncing happens ongoing based on changes and automation rules.

In order for Pardot information to be available to Sales reps in Salesforce, those reps must have a Pardot license, as well. While not necessary, it is also recommended that those users be setup with Single Sign On, too. While this isn’t a big deal in Classic because it will just not load the Visualforce pages, if you’re using Lightning, and the sales rep doesn’t have Pardot access, the page will not load at all.

System Maintenance

I’m going to spare us all. This is the age of cloud-based platforms. System updates happen automatically in both systems – Marketo has 3 major releases and 3 minor releases per year. Pardot has them whenever they feel like. Just kidding! Monthly.

Certification

Getting certified in these platforms are fantastic ways to expand your career, so being able to do so is important.

Marketo

I took the Marketo certification twice. I took it twice because in order to re-certify, you have to take the whole the test again. And it even costs the same!

I don’t get to play with Marketo anymore. There are no training sandboxes or anything like that, so many of my screenshots have to come either from previous presentations or from their docs site. It makes it really daunting to consider re-certifying. There have been some big changes in the Marketo game, and I wouldn’t have the hands-on practice that I’d need to really get in there.

Pardot

I’m working on my Pardot certification right now, but I can tell you this – sandboxes and an entire certification track of training. There are so many resources out there, and recertification is like Salesforce’s process. Take a release exam. You stay up-to-date on those new functionalities and changes, and you are golden.

Salesforce, as a whole, makes certification a relatively painless process, so that the only really difficult part is the actual exam. Which is the way it should be.

Summary

Administering any platform application is going to come with some challenges, but those challenges should not be caused or exacerbated by the platform itself. Software is designed to make people’s jobs easier, and while being the administrator doesn’t mean using the platform to streamline our own job, it shouldn’t be hard, either.

Marketo and Pardot both provide easy ways to support users and customize the platform, with the exception of certification, Marketo wins this round.