The niche struggle is real

There are so many smart people in the Salesforce Ohana. Seriously. So many. They are in the community, on Twitter, writing blogs, hosting podcasts, just generally being awesome. Need to know how to write a formula? There’s a blog for that. Process Builder trouble? There’s a weekly webcast for that. Prepping for an exam? So many sites to help.

As someone who has always been the person on the edge of social circles, one foot in and just hesitant enough to not insert myself, I can tell you that it can be hard to find your place in any situation. As someone who likes to write, who feels safest being herself behind a keyboard, I can also tell you that it’s not any easier finding your place via the blogosphere.

When I first started with Salesforce, blogs helped me become a better admin. I used Salesforce’s documentation to learn the functionality, but project and product management, understanding users’ needs, best practices…that all came from the community. Once I started feeling more confident, I wanted to share what I had learned with others. I’ve tried a few avenues – speaking at events, starting the local Women in Tech chapter, evangelizing on the streets, you name it. Oh yeah. And this thing you’re reading.

I have a backlog of drafts about a mile long. Posts I’ve started, trying to fit into my own little corner of the Salesforce blog world. Am I a place for new admins to learn basic functionality? Am I a marketing automation guru? Maybe I should talk about consulting? Women in Tech. Community. Automation. Communication. Learning to code. Etc. Etc.

Guess what? It exists already.

There are days I find it disheartening. I don’t have the experience or knowledge that many of the existing bloggers have. It’s easy to be down on myself, to feel inadequate, to think that this whole thing is a waste of time.

Not what it’s about, though.

If you want to share something or do something or create something in this community, I’m giving you the permission and the advice to do it. Even if it’s already been done. Even if you think no one will care. All of those blogs and MVPs and community heroes didn’t become experts overnight. They all started somewhere, and they are all here to support you.

Oh, and if you’re looking for your niche, your expertise? It’s you. It’s your unique perspective, your own experiences. That’s all you need. So you’re basically half way there.

 

10 thoughts on “The niche struggle is real

  1. When I was first starting out and started my blog as a way to share an automation solution I responded to in the success community, I too had to think what would I make this blog about. There were already so many automation gurus out there – Rakesh, Brian, Mark, Mike, Chris, etc. Who am I to try and join that pool and share my automation solutions? I thought about what I was passionate about. It was automation so I said, the heck with it. That’s what I want to share. So, my blog is mostly process automation solutions, but it’s also about my experiences with certifications, security, Salesforce releases, Trailhead content (!!). I may offer a different perspective than others and while it may be yet another blog, that’s ok. I’m sharing my passion and that is all that matters! So, don’t be intimidated. Go for it!

  2. I like that message. Even if others have talked about it, your own perspective and presentation will make it worthwhile. So many things have been written about at least once, but it’d be a shame if that was it.

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