Marketo v. Pardot Cage Match: Round 3, Administration

If you’re wondering “why are we talking about administration, if the last round was emails?” Well, frankly, because it was the next thing I thought about. I kept trying to think of a logical order to do these in and just came up short. Then I remembered that this is my blog, and I can do these in whatever order they come to mind.

So let’s talk about what Administration means here.

A lot of marketing automation functionality focuses on marketing (true story). And a lot of comparisons and ratings focus on that. That’s good; it matters. But if you’re responsible for managing the platform, there’s more than email templates, campaign managements, and calendars. There are integrations to consider, user management, and what-have-you.

Round 3 of our cage match focuses on common administration functions: user management, integrations, system maintenance, and certification.

User Management

How easy is it to create users and control their access to the database?

Marketo

If you can read and click on checkboxes, then you can manage users and permissions in Marketo.

marketousers

Users and Roles that can be assigned are managed in the same place, under the Admin section of Marketo.

marketoroleRoles should be set up first, and editing or creating them is simply a matter of checking off the items that the role should have access to. Access and abilities are provided in handy sections – you can check the global setting or get granular, if need-be.
Easy as that.

Adding users is about the same. Simply click on the New button, put in the email, select their Role, provide an access expiration if necessary, and boom – the new user is emailed.

Access to Marketo is not controlled by license, but some functionality – namely the Calendar – is. Keep that in mind.

Pardot

Maybe it’s because I just handled issues surrounding this, but one thing that you must understand about Pardot users – if you want sales reps to see Pardot info in Salesforce, they MUST have a license. And if you want it to be easy for them to access, you MUST turn on SSO for each of them. Not doing so can cause issues.

Point, Marketo.

Other than that, it works much the same. Create  a user, send them an email, and there is no user license cost.

Integration

Beyond integration to a CRM (which is important. I did a session about it!), which is important, how easy is it to integrate with other services?

Marketo

LaunchPoint. LAUNCHPOINT.

For the uninitiated, LaunchPoint is basically a big book of available integrations that just require you to sign into the thing you want to integrate. They have a pretty good list of things that do this.

Is the integration that you need NOT on LaunchPoint? I bet they use REST or SOAP API, in which case you can access your endpoint, userID, and encryption directly in the Admin area of Marketo. They have a host of partners out there that can be setup and integrated in 15 minutes.

As far as Salesforce integration goes, it’s easy to set up and maintain. Create a Marketo user (with its own Profile), put in that user’s information in Marketo, and that’s it. Ok, that’s not it. There’s other setup – creating the fields that are needed, making sure to hide anything you don’t want Marketo to have access to, etc. But essentially that’s it.

From there on out, every 5 minutes there’s a sync. You can sync Leads, Contacts, Campaigns – it all fits together really well.

Your Sales reps can see Marketo information via the AppExchange packages Sales Insights. This creates Visualforce pages that you can add to the page layout (now Lightning compatible), as well as a custom object where ALL Marketo information can be found. Reps do not have to have a Marketo license in order to use these features.

Pardot

Pardot calls them Connectors – a series of pre-built integration between Pardot, certain CRMs, and other marketing software types (webinar platforms, social media platforms, etc.).

They have a pretty good list of options.

pardotconnectors

But if you use something else, you need to know how to create some API integrations.

Connecting to Salesforce here is similar – you create a Pardot user in Salesforce and then use those credentials to create the connection. Then you have to individually map custom fields to Salesforce. Once that’s done, you can use Automation rules to sync the lists that you want, or you can sync individual Prospects. Syncing happens ongoing based on changes and automation rules.

In order for Pardot information to be available to Sales reps in Salesforce, those reps must have a Pardot license, as well. While not necessary, it is also recommended that those users be setup with Single Sign On, too. While this isn’t a big deal in Classic because it will just not load the Visualforce pages, if you’re using Lightning, and the sales rep doesn’t have Pardot access, the page will not load at all.

System Maintenance

I’m going to spare us all. This is the age of cloud-based platforms. System updates happen automatically in both systems – Marketo has 3 major releases and 3 minor releases per year. Pardot has them whenever they feel like. Just kidding! Monthly.

Certification

Getting certified in these platforms are fantastic ways to expand your career, so being able to do so is important.

Marketo

I took the Marketo certification twice. I took it twice because in order to re-certify, you have to take the whole the test again. And it even costs the same!

I don’t get to play with Marketo anymore. There are no training sandboxes or anything like that, so many of my screenshots have to come either from previous presentations or from their docs site. It makes it really daunting to consider re-certifying. There have been some big changes in the Marketo game, and I wouldn’t have the hands-on practice that I’d need to really get in there.

Pardot

I’m working on my Pardot certification right now, but I can tell you this – sandboxes and an entire certification track of training. There are so many resources out there, and recertification is like Salesforce’s process. Take a release exam. You stay up-to-date on those new functionalities and changes, and you are golden.

Salesforce, as a whole, makes certification a relatively painless process, so that the only really difficult part is the actual exam. Which is the way it should be.

Summary

Administering any platform application is going to come with some challenges, but those challenges should not be caused or exacerbated by the platform itself. Software is designed to make people’s jobs easier, and while being the administrator doesn’t mean using the platform to streamline our own job, it shouldn’t be hard, either.

Marketo and Pardot both provide easy ways to support users and customize the platform, with the exception of certification, Marketo wins this round.

 

 

Marketo v. Pardot Cage Match: Round 2, Sending Emails

Edited to include a note on Marketo’s Email Editor v2.0

First of all, disclaimer: Marketing Automation is not just for email automation. It does a lot more than that. However, for a small team that is just starting out with Marketing Automation, this is likely where you’re going to start, so that’s where we are now.

It also is something that should be considered as part of any and all marketing initiatives. It’s easy to think that “email marketing” and “sending emails via Marketing Automation” are the same thing, but they are not.

Email marketing is a channel of marketing.

Sending emails is the ability to send an email to a prospect – be that via email marketing, specifically, transactional emails, drip campaigns, or even internal messaging.

Now that that’s out of the way, here’s how I’m breaking down this round of the cage match:

  1. Planning: this involves the process of planning what and when to send
  2. Designing: this involves the ease of creating the email – can you clone something you’ve built, how do templates work, etc.
  3. Sending: this is pretty straightforward. How easy is it to send the thing you’ve planned and created?
  4. What I am NOT covering: Dynamic content in emails – I will be handling things like this in another post.

These are exceptionally broad-stroke sections, I realize. A lot goes into planning. But since every team does planning just a little bit differently, I don’t want to get into the nitty-gritty here. I’ll give examples, though, don’t worry about that.

Continue reading

I’m Learning Pardot

I am taking the plunge.

When I accepted my new job offer, it came contingent upon my finishing a few more exams, including at least one for Pardot.

I thoroughly enjoy marketing, and I’m a big fan of marketing automation (if it’s not clear from my speaking sessions always including it), so I’ve decided to tackle the Pardot cert first.

I realize that doesn’t seem like a big deal. “Ok. A certification. Great. Don’t you have some of those?” Yeah, I do. And I’m not writing this to reinvent the wheel and provide a “how I passed” overview. First off, I haven’t taken it yet, so that would be premature and a little conceited. Second, those exist.

The only reason I felt this news needed any sort of nod is because I ran a Marketo shop, and I have at least one purple piece of swag in my possession. My backpack from Marketing Nation is pretty much my favorite – it is the perfect size for my work computer, and it carries more than it seems like it would.

The fact is, Marketo doesn’t allow re-certification if you’re not a customer. That puts me in a bit of a bind. When I left my last company, I knew that the day would come when I have to remove “Marketo Certified Expert” from my resume and LinkedIn. Frankly, that sucks. I earned that. Twice, in fact because Marketo’s exam maintenance consists of re-taking the exam every year.

My cert is up in December, so until then, I can call myself “MCE,” but afterwards…well, I need some feather in my cap.

And so it begins.

Dear Vista Equity Partners (re: Marketo),

Hey, there.

This is a pretty big win for you guys, I’m guessing, nabbing the leader in the marketing automation space. Honestly, good for you.

I don’t like just passively hearing news, you know? So I took a look at your portfolio. I was mildly impressed – lots of technology there. I didn’t know an equity firm owned Return Path, so that was kind of cool to learn.

Anyway, that’s not what this about.

Admittedly, this will have less impact on me now. Did you know that you lose your Marketo certification if you don’t work for a company that uses Marketo? So I’m out in the cold there, unfortunately.

But I still have kind of a soft spot for the platform. It was my first cert, you see. Purple and I have a special relationship. I put a lot of time into my old instance, and I even almost contracted part time on a project. So even though I am kind of kicked out of the club, I want to make sure this all works out.

This isn’t me getting angry or even telling you how to your job. Not at all. Look at your portfolio – you know what you’re doing. This is about me asking that you help Marketo get to the next level.

As I learned more about the platform, it was easy to see that Marketo wants to be a leader, wants to be innovative, wants to do right by its customers. And it does a lot.

Sometimes, though, I got this feeling that they liked a product idea, went after it, and then deployed it…incomplete. Not always! But training materials might sometimes lag behind. Functionality that other, smaller, platforms have is missing in the industry leader (dwell time on an email, for instance).

I mentioned Return Path earlier…I hope there’s something in the works there. Honestly, for a platform that a lot of companies use primarily for email campaigns, having that kind of optimization functionality would be amazing.

And I see that Main Street Hub has some social functions? That was one of the only pieces really missing from Marketo.

I guess what I’m trying to say here is that you’ve made a good purchase, and now Marketo and her customers are looking to you to do something big. Pump equity into development of the product, support it, and champion it. I don’t think she’ll steer you wrong, if you treat her right.

In other words (barely contained glee) with great purchase, comes great responsibility.

A Polymath’s Guide To…Submitting Speaking Proposals

There are 6 days left to submit a speaking proposal for Dreamforce 16. If you’re considering it, on the fence, not sure, I’m here to tell you to give it a shot. You have something to share. I promise.

Sit down, let me tell you a story.

Within 6 months of starting this job (the one that I’m saying goodbye to this week), I was a Marketo Certified Expert. And you know, I still didn’t feel like an expert.

Less than a year after that, Marketing Nation Summit put out a call for speakers. I had never done a speaking engagement that large. I wasn’t a Marketo Champion. I still didn’t feel like an expert. Maybe I just was feeling invincible, or more likely a little nihilistic – what does it matter if I’m accepted to speak or not? It won’t solve the world’s problems. *dramatic weeping*

I figured it would be a good practice for writing a proposal. I thought I might get some feedback about why my submission was passed over.

Instead, a few months later, I got an email saying “Hey! We’re super excited to have you speak at Summit!”

I was really excited, too. And then I was nervous. Now I had to actually, you know, create content and present. It wasn’t enough to feel kind of ready to share information, or to kind of feel like I knew what I was talking about. I had to present myself like an expert. I had to ensure that people weren’t wasting their time. No pressure.

Now, I’m going to let you in on a secret: these events want you to speak, and they want you to succeed. I had two contacts to help me prepare – one to make sure I had everything I needed, and one to help me ensure the content was accurate and helpful. We did dry-runs and presentation reviews, and they were available to answer any questions. I didn’t have to be an expert in everything because they were there to help me become one, at least long enough to impart some wisdom.

Moral of this story: there is no reason not to submit, if you feel even somewhat inclined to do so.

speaker

But how do I go about it?

  1. Think of a mistake you made, especially early on – some lesson you learned the hard way. OR think of something that your users or coworkers struggle with that you’re just really good at. Either option will likely be a popular or useful topic.
  2. Every day, navigate to the speaker submission page. Trust me. It’s weird, but it helps. Just a tab that sits there, reminding you to at least consider it.
  3. Determine if you want to present solo or with someone. If you want to present with someone, reach out to a few people you know or would like to get to know better, and ask them.
  4. Come up with a few titles – a funny one, a serious one, a straightforward one. Whatever you think of, write it down/type it up. You can settle on one before you submit.
  5. Write an abstract. It needs to be fairly short, and it needs to pack a punch. I’m a fan of extended metaphors, so I usually default accordingly.
  6. Ask people 100% unrelated to your job to critique them – could they reasonably understand what your session is about? If so, guaranteed someone even remotely associated with what you do will also understand it.
  7. Fill out the submission form. Don’t send it in yet – you’re nervous, I get it.
  8. Fill out the submission form again. Your confidence is building. The information is already there, right?
  9. If you didn’t press submit the second time, go ahead and fill out the form once more, and this time press that button.
  10. Congratulations! You just submitted an idea!

Now guess what? You’ll probably forget about it. It takes a while for event folks to pour over submissions and decide what makes the cut, and your life is going to continue on. You’ll have the same people complaining, the same folks asking questions, the same men and women inviting you out for a happy hour(I imagine you’re more social than I am – maybe not. Maybe, like me, you’ll just keep playing games.).

I’ve since had sessions rejected, too. And, yeah, it kind of sucks, but it’s really not that bad. It doesn’t mean you can’t go to the event, doesn’t mean you have nothing to offer. It also means you don’t have to miss any presentations to be there for yours. It means that you can go and have fun and not be pacing around your hotel room reciting the lines to a fake rap you wrote to wow the audience.

So what’s stopping you, really? Only you are.

 

Sales Cloud for Marketing 1: Intro

I’ve had my fun, talking about myself, letting my freak flag fly, etc. But now it’s down to brass tax and all that. No one starts a Salesforce blog just to see their words on the screen (I  mean, that’s part of it) – they do it to give back to the community that offers them so much.

I’m no expert (obviously), but like most solo admins out there, I have a unique situation that has given me some insight that others might not have. You see, technically I work for my marketing team. I am the “Marketing Data and Systems Analyst,” which is totally cool, but it doesn’t accurately reflect what I do.

In reality, I support Marketing, Sales, Account Management (Client Services), and pretty soon, Customer Support potentially. I also help out our training team and our implementation team sometimes. I work with Finance. And sometimes I rub elbows with IT.

But technically I’m in marketing.

The bulk of my data analysis needs to be for both Marketing and Sales, which means most of my data management must balance both teams’ needs, as well. If I were to romanticize what I do, I’d say that I find ways to bridge the data gap between Sales and Marketing. In reality, I just have two cats that I’m constantly trying to herd into one place without them hissing territorially.

There are a few ways I’ve worked this out, and I intend to share them. For the record, my solutions thus far have depended on the following:

  1. We use the Enterprise version of SFDC, Sales Cloud only (so far)
  2. We are on the SMB-Select edition of Marketo

To keep things relatively short, I’m going to break this information out into a couple of posts to make a series, the Sales Cloud for Marketing series to be precise.

I’m going to cover a few things that I’ve learned herding these cats.

My first post in the series will be Marketo-heavy, and it will talk about some best practices on building Programs that will sync nicely with Salesforce. Those of you that use other marketing automation tools, the following part might be more applicable, and it will be making the case for making most, if not all, SFDC users “Marketing Users.”

I look forward to sharing this journey with you!

 

 

 

 

Did I mention I’m speaking at Marketing Nation Summit?

I love Salesforce. I love being a Salesforce admin. I love that it’s been a great path for me to start working on actual developer skills. It’s pretty fantastic.

It’s also not all I do. In addition to that, I’m my team’s Certified Marketo Expert. I suggest to anyone that is a Salesforce admin for a company that uses Marketo – at least become familiar with it. The way they work together is good to know and can really help in the design of extremely robust data management plans.

It’s been a wild ride so far, and a lot of the challenges I had when I took the keys to my Production Org were the same that I had with Marketo. Getting the engine running again was maybe even more difficult with Marketo because there are so many more places where people can make things go terribly, terribly wrong.

So this May, I’ll be speaking at Marketo’s Marketing Nation Summit about how I audited our Marketo instance and got it running a bit more smoothly.

I don’t have all of the details yet. In fact, I’m still just barely scratching the surface of how I’d like to present, but it’s been on my mind. I’m excited for this opportunity, and I wanted to share it. I’ll keep updates coming, as they seem necessary.

And if you’re also a Marketo user going to Summit – hey, hit me up!