GTD: One Year Later

I wrote, just over a year ago, about discovering GTD…that’s a misnomer. I didn’t discover it. It was required reading. But…I mean, it’s kind of discovering?

Not the point.

A year ago I wrote about being new to the concept, new to the practice, and now, with little time to write these days and even less capacity for new ideas for this blog, I am reviewing my last year in GTD. In my typical fashion, no less.

First, my confession. I royally sucked at All The Things for most of the last year. It’s a hard thing to learn. Especially for someone who has random thoughts throughout the day, some of which might be worth capturing, but the vast majority of them not really…tangible or worth making not of. I swung wildly between extremes. I wrote everything down, but then I would exhaust myself going through all the stuff. So then I scaled back, but I scaled back too far. And frankly, after Zoe passed, there was about a month of me just trying to stay above water at all.

Even through the struggle and the sucking really bad at following the really clear directions provided, I adopted small things that worked really well for me. Organizing ideas, to-do’s, etc. by project? Super helpful. In a way that I thought would be overblown, but it made it clear just how dis-organized my prior organization had been. What is a project? Anything that is more than one task. Well that makes it really simple to identify a way to categorize projects. That and…you know…managing projects as my job.

I tried not to beat myself up about it too much because, from conversations with others who had started out with GTD brand new, there’s often a time of off and on again.


But I did beat myself up about it. A lot. And frequently. Like anything else, it’s something that I knew I needed to devote more time to, devote more energy to, and so I would try, but when I failed, I failed hard. Or at least I thought. I was trying to mimic, in every way, other people’s processes.

And then in November things kind of clicked into place. I wish I could say there was a sudden shift or some specific thing that happened that made it all clear, but there wasn’t. I just realized that I couldn’t do things exactly like other people. Even the book makes it clear that there are levels and different ways of doing things – the concepts are what matter, not the tactics.

So I gave myself one goal. Every day I needed to review OmniFocus. I put no restrictions on myself in terms of when that happens or in what context, but each day, I need to review OmniFocus.

What a difference that made. Instead of trying to force myself to do X, Y, and Z, I just said “do this one thing.” The rest sort of fell into place.

Because I knew I would be checking OmniFocus, I started entering important things there. Sometimes as a generic capture-to-inbox thing, and sometimes as a go-to-the-project-and-spell-it-out thing. No pressure. And if I was in between back-to-back things and didn’t put it in immediately, that’s ok because I’ll be checking it later, anyway, and I can add all of those little extra things then.

That’s really the point. It’s not about following the “rules” or step-by-step instructions. It’s about freeing yourself of having to remember all the things. I don’t have to remember all the things. I just have one goal, every day, and if I’m consistent with that, the rest falls into place.

Still not perfect. Still forget some days. But it’s better, and I think that’s all we can ever ask for.